Hearing impaired crew

Hearing impaired crew

Postby AndyMac » Sat Sep 05, 2015 8:47 pm

I know this can be a subject with a lot of humor but I would like to get VERY serious for a moment.
Has anyone had to deal with crew that hearing impaired or completely deaf.
I would like to open up this discussion and swap ideas.
My wife is hearing impaired and currently has 2 hearing aids that have to be removed in foul weather. Her prognosis is total deafness. We just don't know when

Thanks
Jeff
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Postby Bernie Tresner » Sun Sep 06, 2015 8:43 pm

If you listen to my wife, I'm Stone deaf. I'm not. We have setup hand signals for anchoring, docking, course change and most importantly, refilling of beverage glasses.
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Postby Tom Overs » Mon Sep 07, 2015 3:13 am

Bernie Tresner wrote:If you listen to my wife, I'm Stone deaf. I'm not. We have setup hand signals for anchoring, docking, course change and most importantly, refilling of beverage glasses.


Having cruised with B I would just like to say.....

1. He has selective hearing.
2. Some of the hand signals are nothing to do with being on the water.
3. He has self filling bottles and glasses.

Tom.
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Postby Barry L » Mon Sep 07, 2015 5:51 am

Now that is a boating issue that new to this forum. I would think she should carry some sort of little vibrating device so that with a push of a button you can get her attention. Like a phone but simpler. Hand signals only work if people are looking :?
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Postby Bob Lowe » Mon Sep 07, 2015 7:22 am

How about glasses with a heads up display?
Good luck,
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Postby Don Prior » Mon Sep 07, 2015 9:25 am

Jeff

My father was deaf or mostly so. It was normally not a problem but it could be a bit scary around machinery. He was an avid woodworker with a basement wood shop. We, as kids, used to flick the basement light on and off before going into the shop so we would not startle him when he was using the lathe or table saw.

It would seem to me that a vibrating device such as my Fitbit watch would be an excellent accessory. I am sure there must be such a thing available. My watch is blue tooth connected to my phone and laptop so there must be a way to trigger the vibrating alarm. The same for a cell phone.

That said I am in the same category as B myself. The Admiral calls it selective hearing but I call it focused attention.

Fair winds.

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Postby kildarian » Mon Sep 07, 2015 11:23 am

Jeff
I wear HAs. They are classed as 'water resistant' Phonak Naida BTEs. Never had any issues with foul weather when hiking etc. I also wear them during swiftwater rescues, with SAR, - which usually includes full immersion. I wear a thin neoprene skull cap, under my helmet, as most other do - mainly for cold protection. Yes, I have medical dispensation for my 'selective hearing' which I use to full advantage ... wouldn't be without it!! Hope you find a solution.

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Hearing Impaired

Postby harry » Mon Sep 07, 2015 5:43 pm

As a hearing-aid wearer, I find the worst situation aboard is trying to understand VHF transmissions. Many VHF users hold the microphone too close to their mouths. Result is that we hear them but don't understand them. Coast Guard communicators often speak too rapidly to understand. Anchoring and raising anchor is done entirely with hand signals ( from me at bow to wife on bridge.) Cellphone conversations while motoring at cruising speed are iffy. Much better with I-Phone than with older flip phones. (activate loudspeaker prompt.) Bob Siegel Annapolis
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