Voting

Exchanges of whatever comes to mind - not necessarily boat related

Voting

Postby Marin Faure » Thu Nov 03, 2016 10:00 pm

Well, my wife and I voted today and it was a disappointing experience to say the least. I've voted in every election since I turned 18 and I've always split my ticket, voting for who I thought the best candidates were for each position regardless of their party affiliation or overall political philosophy. I feel some issues warrant a conservative approach where others would be better served with a progressive approach.

But this is the first election where almost none of my votes were FOR anyone but instead were AGAINST someone. Better, I believe, than not voting at all but a bummer nevertheless.

Here's an article I came across awhile back that I think does a great job of explaining why recent elections-- local, state and federal-- have been so sucky in recent years. Based on my observations, I think it's right on the money despite the fact it's about my own generation.

https://apple.news/AwOW3Ab75RZ6dpLFz2fSQkw

Based on this the GenXers and Millennials can't take charge soon enough in my opinion. And not just here, either. Hopefully they'll steer the UK onto the right track, too, be it in or out of the EU. So maybe there's hope yet. :)
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Postby Bob Lowe » Fri Nov 04, 2016 7:05 am

Obviously written by an extreme liberal supporter of the liberal left including HRC.

When I read "who with his narcissistic and uncompromising style is a bright orange symbol of what went wrong with the massive generation" I immediately thought of Obama. A more narcissistic, "my way or the highway", to hell with is best for the people and the country type guy or gal would be hard to find.

The author needs a history lesson in who/what caused what. Or perhaps he was simply rewriting a little history in support of his cause. That's where it starts, the rewriting of history.....

I would not place too much stock in what he said, Marin, except his inference that the people are simply too tired of having liberal values and political correctness forced upon them and theirs. In that, e would be correct.

Hopefully, a change in the direction of the country and pendulum is upon us. We need it. And IMHO, voting against someone or something is just as important as voting for something, especially when there is nothing worth voting FOR!

I have thought that the support for Trump is more a vote against the present leadership. Trump is an outsider which the US desperately needs.

I never thought he was serious about being POTUS and simply wanted to inject some different values into the political discussion. Then he got swept up by hitting that cord with the people. Actually, it's good to see. :)
Good luck,
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Postby bill.read » Fri Nov 04, 2016 11:49 am

I couldn't resist one last post on the subject, from an OP-ED in the NY Times:

Donald Trump Voters, Just Hear Me Out

This is my last column until after Nov. 8, so I’d like to address the people least likely to read it: Donald Trump voters. Who knows? Maybe I’ll get lucky and a few of them will buy fish wrapped in this column, and they’ll accidentally peruse it! Desperate times call for desperate measures.
While I’ve opposed his candidacy from the start, I’ve never disparaged Trump voters. Some are friends and neighbors; they’re all fellow Americans. We should take their concerns seriously. But we should also demand that they be serious, that they draw distinctions between these two presidential candidates.
Yes, Hillary Clinton is a flawed leader — but in the way so many presidents were. We know her flaws: She has a weakness for secrecy, occasionally fudges truths, has fawning aides and a husband who lacks discipline when it comes to moneymaking and women. But she is not indecent, and that is an important distinction. And she’s studious, has sought out people of substance on every issue and has taken the job of running for president seriously.
Trump is not only a flawed politician, he’s an indecent human being. He’s boasted of assaulting women — prompting 11 to come forward to testify that he did just that to them; his defense is that he could not have assaulted them because they weren’t pretty enough.
He’s created a university that was charged with defrauding its students. He’s been charged with discriminating against racial minorities in his rental properties. He’s stiffed countless vendors — big and small. He’s refused to disclose his tax returns because they likely reveal that he’s paid no federal taxes for years, is in bed with dodgy financiers and doesn’t give like he says to charity. He’s compared the sacrifice of parents of a soldier killed in Iraq to his “sacrifice” of building tall buildings. He’s vowed, if elected, to prosecute his rival.
We have never seen such behaviors in a presidential candidate.
And, he has shown no ability to talk about any policy issue with any depth. Harlan Coben’s debate-night tweet had it right: “On Aleppo he sounds like a fifth-grader giving a book report on a book he never read.”
I understand why many Trump supporters have lost faith in Washington and want to just “shake things up.” But when you shake things up, guided by one-liners and no moral compass, you can cause enormous instability and systemic vertigo.
But there is an even more important reason supporters, particularly less-educated white males, should be wary of Trump’s bluster: His policies won’t help them. He promises to bring their jobs back. But most of their jobs didn’t go to a Mexican. They went to a microchip.
The idea that large numbers of manual factory jobs can be returned to America if we put up a wall with Mexico or renegotiate trade deals is a fantasy. Trump ignores the fact that manufacturing is still by far the largest sector of the U.S. economy. Our factories produce twice that of 1984 — with one-third fewer workers.
Trump can’t change that. Machines and software will keep devouring, and spawning, more work of all kinds. IBM’s cognitive computer, Watson, helped create pop song, “Not Easy,” with Grammy-winning producer Alex da Kid. The song was released Oct. 21, and within 48 hours, climbed to No. 4 on iTunes’s Hot Tracks. No one knows for certain how we deal with this new race with and against machines, but it’s not Trump’s way — build walls, restrict trade, give huge tax cuts to the rich. The best jobs in the future are going to be what I call “STEM-pathy jobs — jobs that blend STEM skills (science, technology, engineering, math) with human empathy. We don’t know what many of them will look like yet.
The smartest thing we can do now is to keep our economy as open and flexible as possible — to get the change signals first and be able to quickly adapt; create the opportunity for every American to engage in lifelong learning, because emerging jobs will require more knowledge; make sure learning stresses as much of the humanities and human interactive skills as hard sciences; have an immigration policy that continues to attract the world’s most imaginative risk-takers; and strengthen safety nets, because this era will leave more people behind.
This is the only true path to American greatness in the 21st century.
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Postby Marin Faure » Sat Nov 05, 2016 11:26 am

I believe the situation most Trump supporters are reacting to is very real. Our government has, for a whole lot of reasons, become unwieldy, unresponsive, out of touch with reality and today is certainly not of the people or for the people. Major change is most definitely needed.

However change just for change's sake can be just as damaging, or more so, than no change. This, I believe, is the case with Trump. The man is staggeringly ignorant and has a hideous personality. He is the very definition of unqualified and incompetent for the job. Just because he recognizes and is preying on the very real and justified dissatisfaction of a large segment of the citizenry of this country does not mean he should be given the job of trying to fix it. The cliche "out of the fying pan and into the fire" has a basis in reality.

With regard to generational evolution, I believe that values change from generation to generation and that these changes reflect the upbringing by and reaction to the previous generation(s).

Based on what I have observed and experienced during my first two careers in the media and the aerospace industry, both of which have brought me in contact with a huge cross section of people in the WWII, baby boom, X and Y, and most recently milennial generations, I find myself in total agreement with the ideas expressed in the article in the link I posted. The forces that affect history are incredibly complex and trying to reduce them to a simplistic finger-point to one factor is unrealistic and misleading. However i have long felt that the baby boom generation's basic values and attitudes have caused more problems than they've solved.

This is a huge generality, no question, and there are plenty of achievements the boomers can point to with justifiable pride. But when I look at the companies and industries I've been associated with, their worst decisions and poorest internal (and sometimes external) performance has been when the boomers were in charge.

Today, as the boomers retire in increasingly large numbers and the day-to-day decisions, leadership and work is being taken over by the next three generations, it's obvious-- at least to me-- that the internal attitudes, decision-making and work environment are changing for the better.

It's very, very different, no question. The outgoing generation in particular, including me, has a tough time understanding, accepting and dealing with this change. In many cases we just can't relate to what's happening at all. But if I back myself oway from my instinctive reactions and look at the situation as objectively as I can, the younger folks are going to accomplish more than we did in a more successful, more effective and more beneficial manner. I have no doubt about this, in large part because I've been seeing and living this shift in the large company and industry I've been working in for the past 37 years.

Sure, there are exceptions but overall in my experience and observation, the "incomers" are going to be a whole lot better and more effective in almost every respect than the boomers. Which, I think, is a Good Thing. :)
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