CO2 Monitors on a GB 32'

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CO2 Monitors on a GB 32'

Postby dhinman » Mon Sep 15, 2014 10:37 am

I've been out of circulation here for a few years so I'm wandering back.

Where on a GB 32 would you locate a Fireboy - Xintex CO Sentinel? Did you run wires to them? I used to have two battery operated ones but they don't make them anymore.

Many thanks in advance,

Dave
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Postby Bob Lowe » Mon Sep 15, 2014 11:14 am

On Dreamer, we put our CO detector in the master cabin on the belief that we are most vulnerable when sleeping,

However, CO being slightly lighter than air allows it to escape if the boat is well ventilated which Dreamer always was when underway.

In port or at anchor, the only source on Dreamer for CO was the genset and the diesel furnace which we did not use at night, especially down south. :)
Good luck,
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Postby Sleepah » Tue Sep 16, 2014 7:29 am

I used to run my genset before the Admiral (wife) was up so I put one over her bunk in the aft cabin. It was battery operated. There was a blinking light which I taped over.
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Postby Bella Grand » Tue Sep 16, 2014 11:40 am

I 110% agree with Bob -- in the stateroom.
I am always more concerned with the boats around me, especially if gas. I have seen several detectors on boats go off when rafted up to someone with a gas genset.
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Postby 2Bucks » Thu Sep 18, 2014 11:12 am

For diesel engined boaters the major danger is from other boats, either gasoline generators or long idling at startup. Diesel engines produce reletively low amounts of CO. Diesel boaters seldom if ever suffer from the "station wagon effect" which kills numerous gasoline engined boaters every year.

Do be aware that if you have propane appliances, heaters, stoves or furnaces you reintroduce a potential for CO poisoning on your own boat.

Our CO detector is in our stateroom and another is in the engine room. CO detectors will detect severely offgassing batteries also. It's called cross interference. If you have a battery gone bad causing the charger to continue to overcharge the batteries the CO detector will sound.

This chart https://www.indsci.com/services/trainin ... erference/ shows the other gasses that will set off a CO detector. Just follow the 100's diagonally across the chart.

And finally remember that the CO sensor has a lifespan. Generally 4-7 years is all they're good for before replacement is needed. Oversaturation will also kill a sensor. If you hold it up to the exhaust pipe to check it, you may as well just throw it away and buy another.

Ken
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Postby Stretch Head » Fri Sep 19, 2014 11:14 am

2Bucks wrote:For diesel engined boaters the major danger is from other boats, either gasoline generators or long idling at startup. Diesel engines produce reletively low amounts of CO. Diesel boaters seldom if ever suffer from the "station wagon effect" which kills numerous gasoline engined boaters every year.

Do be aware that if you have propane appliances, heaters, stoves or furnaces you reintroduce a potential for CO poisoning on your own boat.

Our CO detector is in our stateroom and another is in the engine room. CO detectors will detect severely offgassing batteries also. It's called cross interference. If you have a battery gone bad causing the charger to continue to overcharge the batteries the CO detector will sound.

This chart https://www.indsci.com/services/trainin ... erference/ shows the other gasses that will set off a CO detector. Just follow the 100's diagonally across the chart.

And finally remember that the CO sensor has a lifespan. Generally 4-7 years is all they're good for before replacement is needed. Oversaturation will also kill a sensor. If you hold it up to the exhaust pipe to check it, you may as well just throw it away and buy another.

Ken


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